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Neurobiology of Trauma

October 8, 2020 @ 12:00 pm CDT

This program takes place on October 8th, 2020 from 10:00 AM -11:30 AM PT
This live programs 1.5 APA CEs for Psychologists and 1.5 BBS California CES for LMFTs, LPCCs and LCSWs.
Attendance at the live event is required.
In the assessment, case formulation, and treatment of children at risk the role of trauma and attachment are profoundly intertwined. The work of researchers like Pollak (2010 and 2019), Sameroff (2009), Perry (2019), Schore (2015), Sroufe (2005), Davies & Troy (2020), and others have provided a framework for understanding critical concepts in brain development and the role they play in supporting the overall health and development of children. The focus of this workshop will be on developmental psychopathology, attachment theory, and brain-based research and the identification of the ways in which developmental trauma impacts brain development.Neuroscience has identified core strengths of the brain and how their development is supported through sensory experiences. The capacity to form attachments, develop healthy self-regulation, and to understand the perspective of others are just a few examples of brain-based experiences that have a profound impact on individual functioning (Gaskill & Perry 2012). Neglect and trauma have been shown to impact the functioning of children across these very same domains. (Mash & Barkley 2014) The impact of adverse childhood experiences on these critical systems will be explored.

Both attachment and trauma has been shown to influence both the architecture and biology of the brain on the most basic of levels (Hambric, Brawner, Perry, Brandt, Hofmeister, and Collins 2019). Childhood trauma and the impact of trauma on neurological development, child development, and attachment relationships will be examined. An examination of the stress response system, the dissociative continuum, the HPA Axis, the role of glucocorticoids, and other neurochemicals will be reviewed with clinicians in this workshop. How these concepts impact both symptom presentation and intervention considerations will be integrated throughout the workshop.