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Spanish 101 for Mental Health Providers

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A four-part asynchronous series in Spanish.

Presented by Dr. Nadia Rojas Jones, EdD, LMFT

Each session offers 1.0 APA CEs for Psychologists, 1.0 Illinois CEUs for licensed Counselors or Social Workers, and 1.0 BBS California CEs for Certified Counselors, for 4.0 total CE/CEUs upon completion of the entire course.

Workshop Description:

According to Deborah Bailey and Bruce Hogan (2019), while 18% of Americans identify as Hispanic, less than 6% of Psychologists in the U.S. can provide services in Spanish. Even more concerning, is that less than 50% of Psychologists interview in this survey felt extremely knowledgably in working with Hispanic individuals (Bailey and Hogan, 2019). This proposed webinar series seeks to engage TCSPP students, faculty, and community members in creating a more inclusive environment in mental health settings by introducing non-Spanish speakers and Spanish speaking mental health professionals to the basic words and phrases needed to work with Bi-Lingual (Spanish/English) clients in a culturally competent manner.   

Due to the increasing need of the Spanish speaking population in need of therapy services with an understanding of the language and cultural characteristics of the Latin community, these four, one-hour workshops will train mental health clinicians and current students to speak properly with clinical lingo to the population. 

Learning Objectives:

After attending this intermediate-level workshop, participants will be able to:

  1. Define and explain in Spanish Latin some of the cultural norms and roles in the community.  
  2. Define cultural humility and how it is shown in the welfare system when working with children. 
  3. List at least 2 components of cultural appropriateness when working with the Latino/Hispanic community in Spanish. 
  4. Define ACES and list at least 3 examples. 
  5. Describe crisis assessment and intervention in Spanish. 
  6. Describe how to do a safety plan in Spanish for suicidality and domestic violence.   
  7. Identify at least 3 resources in the community in Spanish. 
  8. Describe at least one concept related to PTSD, Stress, Anxiety and Depression in Spanish. 

Program Standards and Goals:

This program meets APA’s continuing education Standard 1.3: Program content focuses on topics related to psychological practice, education, or research other than application of psychological assessment and/or intervention methods that are supported by contemporary scholarship grounded in established research procedures.

This program meets APA’s continuing education Goal 3: Program will allow psychologists to maintain, develop, and increase competencies in order to improve services to the public and enhance contributions to the profession.

Workshop Breakdown:

  • LESSON 1: Entendiendo a la Comunidad Latina (What does it mean to be Latino?) 
  • LESSON 2: Brindando terapia en Español o Spanglish (The clinical interview in Spanish.)
  • LESSON 3: Entendiendo ACES en Español (Trauma, anxiety, depression and other diagnoses in Spanish) 
  • LESSON 4: Crisis Interventions in Spanish (Abuse, Suicide, Domestic Violence). Understanding Community Resources.  

Presenter Biography:

Dr. Nadia Rojas Jones, EdD, LMFT is Core Faculty of the Marriage and Family Therapy Program at TCSPP in Los Angeles as well as the Associate Director of Community Partnerships. Dr. Jones was a lecturer at California State University Northridge and California State University Dominguez Hills.  Dr. Jones is a bilingual (Spanish) therapist and an AAMFT approved supervisor working in community mental health settings and private practice. Dr. Jones has worked with LA county contracted agencies such as Counseling 4 Kids, Didi Hirsch and The Help Group.  Dr. Jones has her Bachelors and License as a Psychologist from Peru, her Masters in MFT from Argosy University and her Ed.D. in Counseling Psychology also from Argosy University.    Dr. Jones has extensive experience in counseling children, adolescents and families, since her internship years in 2001.  She started working with kindergarten children in the educational psychology field in 2002 and fell in love with the population.  Dr. Jones continued working with children, families and couples in Peru, and then in the U.S. when she moved here in 2005.  In the U.S. she did her internship on a free community mental health clinic, and subsequently joined a DMH contracted agency to focus on the Latino community and other minorities.  Her love for service learning and the community at large led her to work as an Associate Director of Community Partnerships.   Dr. Jones has training and experience in a wide range of modalities of theoretical and evidence-based practice modalities including CBT, Solution Focused, Family Systems, Trauma Focused CBT, Triple-P, Psychodynamics, Play Therapy, Peri and Post Natal Mood Disorders and Cultural Diversity.  Her experience in clinical work with a variety of populations allows her to provide real life case examples to students and to enhance their counseling skills for the jobs they will face in their future.    Dr. Jones’ research focuses on The Positive Parenting Program, trauma, child and adolescent disorders, mom and child relational issues, family therapy and cultural issues.   

References:

Arredondo, P., Gallardo-Cooper, M., Delgado-Romero, E. A., & Zapata, A. L. (2014). Culturally responsive counseling with Latinas/os. American Counseling Association. 

American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (2015). AAMFT code of ethics. Alexandria, VA: AAMFT. 

Bialystok, E., Craik, F. I. M., Green, D. W., & Gollan, T. H. (2009). Bilingual Minds. Psychological Science in the Public Interest, 10(3), 89–129. https://doi.org/10.1177/1529100610387084 

Caldwell, B. E. (2021). Basics of California law for LMFTs,LPCCs, and LCSWs. (8th ed.). Los Angeles, CA: Benjamin E. Caldwell. 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2021). We Can Prevent Aces. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services https://youtu.be/8gm-lNpzU4g 

Corey, Corey, & Corey. (2018). Issues & Ethics in the Helping Professions. (10th ed.). Boston, MA: Cengage 

Foronda, C., Baptiste, D. L., Reinholdt, M. M., & Ousman, K. (2016). Cultural humility: A concept analysis. Journal of Transcultural Nursing, 27(3), 210–217. 

Grosso F. (2017). Complete Applications of Law and Ethics: A Workbook for California Marriage and Family Therapists (15th ed.). 

Inoa Vasquez, C., Comas-Diaz, L. (2018). Latina Psychologists. Thriving in the Cultural Borderlands. Routledge 

Linder, J., Platt, J., & Young, S. (2018). ¿Me explico? Mexican client perspectives on therapy with Spanish as a second language clinicians. In SAGE Research Methods Cases.https://www-doi-org.tcsedsystem.idm.oclc.org/10.4135/9781526458797 

National Domestic Violence Hotline (2022). Entendiendo el Abuso en Las Relaciones. The Hotline.org  

Robertson, P., & Zeh, D. Cross-Cultural Issues in Integrated Care.  In Curtis, R., & Christian, E. (Eds.). (2012). Integrated Care: Applying Theory to Practice. New York: Routledge.  

Swazo, Roberto. The Bilingual Counselor’s Guide to Spanish : Basic Vocabulary and Interventions for the Non-Spanish Speaker, Taylor & Francis Group, 2013. ProQuest Ebook Central, https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/tcsesl/detail.action?docID=1318963. Chapter 3, An Introduction to and Review of the Spanish Language 

Swazo, Roberto. The Bilingual Counselor’s Guide to Spanish : Basic Vocabulary and Interventions for the Non-Spanish Speaker, Taylor & Francis Group, 2013. ProQuest Ebook Central, https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/tcsesl/detail.action?docID=1318963. Chapter 2: Cultrual Norms and Family Systems in the Lation/Hispanic Culture 

U.S. Population Projections: 2005-2050, Pew Research Center. http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2008/02/11/us-population-projections-2005-2050/ 

CONTINUING EDUCATION:

Target Audience: Students in training, associates, interns, Psychologists, LCSWs, MFTs, LCPCs, all mental health disciplines, graduate students welcome too that speak Spanish and want to solidify their clinical terminology in Spanish.

Psychologists (All attendees). This program, when attended in its entirety, is available for 1.5 continuing education credits. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is committed to accessibility and non-discrimination in its continuing education activities. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is also committed to conducting all activities in conformity with the American Psychological Association’s Ethical Principles for Psychologists. Participants are asked to be aware of the need for privacy and confidentiality throughout the program. If program content becomes stressful, participants are encouraged to process these feelings during discussion periods. If participants have special needs, we will attempt to accommodate them. There is no commercial support for this program nor are there any relationships between the CE Sponsor, presenting organization, presenter, program content, research, grants, or other funding that could reasonably be construed as conflicts of interest.

Counselors/Clinical Counselors. This program, when attended in its entirety, is available 3.0 hours of continuing education. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is licensed by the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (IDFPR) to provide continuing education programming for counselors and clinical counselors. License Number: 197.000159

Social Workers. This program, when attended in its entirety, is available for 3.0 hours of continuing education. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is licensed by the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (IDFPR) to provide continuing education programming for social workers. License Number: 159.001036

MFTs, LPCCs, and LCSWs. Course meets the qualifications for 1.5 hour of continuing education credit for MFTs, LPCCs, and/or LCSWs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences. If you are licensed outside of California please check with your local licensing agency to determine if they will accept these CEUs. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is approved by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences (BBS) to offer continuing education programming for MFTs, LPCCs, LEPs, and/or LCSWs. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is an accredited or approved postsecondary institution that meets the requirements set forth in Sections 4980.54(f)(1), 4989.34, 4996.22(d)(1), or 4999.76(d) of the Code.

Other Non Psychologists. Most licensing boards accept Continuing Education Credits sponsored by the American Psychological Association but non-psychologists are recommended to consult with their specific state-licensing board to ensure that APA-sponsored CE is acceptable.

*Participants must attend 100% of the program in order to obtain a Certificate of Attendance.

The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology maintains responsibility for this program and its content.