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Lived Experiences of Professional Counselors with Gender Diverse Clients

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Presented by Veronica M. Wanzer, Ph.D.

Thursday, April 13, 2023

11am-12:30pm PT/ 1pm-2:30pm CT/ 2pm-3:30pm ET

This program, when attended in its entirety, offers 1.5 CEs for Psychologists, 1.5 IL CEUS for Counselors and Social Workers, 1.5 BBS California CEUs for LPCCs, LPSW, and LMFTs, or 1.5 NBCC Clock Hours for National Board Clinical Counselors

Event held online via Zoom, link to access provided upon registration.

Workshop Description:

The goal of this presentation is to educate, elucidate, and encourage growth in the helping profession regarding how we can positively transition to affirmative practices with gender diverse individuals.

The presenter will provide a history of professional helping with the gender diverse community and the trajectory for professional growth.  Additionally, this program will share the outcomes of new research highlighting the clinician’s voice regarding the need for training and education to prepare for counseling with gender diverse clients. 

Learning Objectives:

After attending this advanced-level workshop, participants will be able to:

  1. Apply historical understanding, context, and treatment interventions with gender diverse clients to address the deficits in counselor preparation and training that perpetuate a lack of change.
  2. Describe the outcomes of new research focused on the experiences of counselors working with gender diverse clients
  3. Recognize the specific needs expressed by counselors who work with gender diverse clients

Program Standards and Goals:

This program meets APA’s continuing education standard 1.1: Program content focuses on application of psychological assessment and/or intervention methods that have overall consistent and credible empirical support in the contemporary peer reviewed scientific literature beyond those publications and other types of communications devoted primarily to the promotion of the approach.

This program meets APA’s continuing education goal 3: Program will allow psychologists to maintain, develop, and increase competencies in order to improve services to the public and enhance contributions to the profession.

Workshop Schedule (Shown in CST):

1:00 pm – Event Begins

2:30 pm – Event Ends

Registration and Fees:

Community members: $30

TCSPP Alumni: $20

Students: $15

(Please email [email protected] for coupon code)

Refund Policy: 100% of tuition is refundable up to 48 hours before the program. Within 48 hours of the program, tuition is nonrefundable.

References:

Avera, J., Zholu, Y., Speedlin, S., Ingram, M., & Prado, A. (2015). Transitioning into wellness: Conceptualizing the experiences of transgender individuals using a wellness model. Journal of LGBT Issues in Counseling, 9(4), 273–287. https://doi.org/10.1080/15538605.2015.1103677 

Budge, S. L., Israel, T., & Merrill, C. R. S. (2017). Improving the lives of sexual and gender minorities: The promise of psychotherapy research. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 64(4), 376– 384. https://doi.org/10.1037/cou0000215 Campbell, L. F., & Arkles, G. (2017). Ethical and legal concerns for mental health professionals. In A. Singh, lore m. dickey, A. Singh (Ed), & lore m. dickey (Ed) (Eds.), Affirmative counseling and psychological practice with transgender and gender nonconforming clients. (pp. 95– 118). Washington, DC, US: American Psychological Association. https://doi.org/10.1037/14957-005Case, K. A., & Meier, S. C. (2014). Developing allies to transgender and gender- nonconforming youth: Training for counselors and educators. Journal of LGBT Youth, 11(1), 62-82. doi:10.1080/19361653.2014.840764 

Chan, C. D., & Farmer, L. B. (2017). Making the case for interpretative phenomenological analysis with LGBTGEQ+ persons and communities. Journal of LGBT Issues in Counseling, 11(4), 285-300. https://doi.org/10.1080/15538605.2017.1380558 

Dispenza, F., & O’Hara, C. (2016). Correlates of transgender and gender nonconforming counseling competencies among psychologists and mental health practitioners. Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity, 3(2), 156-164. doi:10.1037/sgd0000151

Hancock, M. E., Amankwaa, L., Revell, M. A., & Mueller, D. (2016). Focus group data saturation: A new approach to data analysis. The Qualitative Report, 21, 2124- 2130. Retrieved from http://nsuworks.nova.edu/tqr/vol21/iss11/13

Lee, Y. (2014). Insight for writing a qualitative research paper. Family and Consumer Sciences Research Journal, 43(1), 94-97. doi:10.1111/fcsr.12084 

McCullough, R., Dispenza, F., Parker, L. K., Viehl, C. J., Chang, C. Y., & Murphy, T. M. (2017). The counseling experiences of transgender and gender nonconforming clients. Journal of Counseling & Development, 95(4), 423–434. https://doi.org/10.1002/jcad.12157 

Mizock, L., & Lundquist, C. (2016). Missteps in psychotherapy with transgender clients: Promoting gender sensitivity in counseling and psychological practice. Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity, 3(2), 148-155. doi:10.1037/sgd0000177 

Moe, J. L., Finnerty, P., Sparkman, N., & Yates, C. (2015). Initial assessment and screening with LGBTQ clients: A critical perspective. Journal of LGBT Issues in Counseling, 9(1), 36– 56. https://doi.org/10.1080/15538605.2014.997332 

Morse, J. M. (2015). Critical analysis of strategies for determining rigor in qualitative inquiry. Qualitative Health Research, 25(9), 1212-1222. https://doi.org/10.1177/1049732315588501 

Neufeld, A. C. (2014). Transgender therapy, social justice, and the northern context: Challenges and opportunities. Canadian Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy, 48(3), 218-230. 

O’Hara, C., Dispenza, F., Brack, G., & Blood, R. C. (2013). The preparedness of counselors in training to work with transgender clients: A mixed methods investigation. Journal of LGBT Issues in Counseling, 7(3), 236-256. 

O’Hara, C., Dispenza, F., Brack, G., & Blood, R. C. (2013). The preparedness of counselors in training to work with transgender clients: A mixed methods investigation. Journal of LGBT Issues in Counseling, 7(3), 236-256. 

Poteat, T., German, D., & Kerrigan, D. (2013). Managing uncertainty: A grounded theory of stigma in transgender health care encounters. Social Science & Medicine, 84, 22-29. doi:10.1016/j.socscimed.2013.02.019 

Ratts, M. J., Singh, A. A., Nassar-McMillan, S., Butler, S. K., & McCullough, J. R. (2016). Multicultural and social justice counseling competencies: Guidelines for the counseling profession. Journal of Multicultural Counseling & Development, 44(1), 28–48. https://doi.org/10.1002/jmcd.12035 

Robinson, O. C. (2014). Sampling in interview-based qualitative research: A theoretical and practical guide. Qualitative Research in Psychology, 11(1), 25-41.Salisbury, M. E., & Dentato, M. P. (2016). An exploratory study examining needs, access, and competent social services for the transgender community in Phoenix, Arizona. Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment, 26(2), 119–136. https://doi.org/10.1080/10911359.2015.1052911 

Shi, Q., & Doud, S. (2017). An examination of school counselors’ competency working with lesbian, gay and bisexual and transgender (LGBT) students. Journal of LGBT Issues in Counseling, 11(1), 2-17. doi:10.1080/15538605.2017.1273165 

Skerven, K., & Aubin, E. de S. (2015). Internalized homonegativity and the double bind for l esbians: Those with higher need perceive more barriers to mental health treatment. Journal of LGBT Issues in Counseling, 9(1), 17–35. https://doi.org/10.1080/15538605.2014.997331 

Sloan, A., & Bowe, B. (2014). Phenomenology and hermeneutic phenomenology: The philosophy, the methodologies, and using hermeneutic phenomenology to investigate lecturers’ experiences of curriculum design. Quality and Quantity,48(3), 1291-1303. https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11135-013-9835-3 

Smith, J. A., Flowers, P., & Larkin, M. (2009). Interpretative phenomenological analysis: Theory, method and research. Los Angeles: SAGE.Spence, D. G. (2017). Supervising for robust hermeneutic phenomenology: Reflexive engagement within horizons of understanding. Qualitative Health Research, 27(6), 836-842. https://doi.org/10.1177/1049732316637824 

Troutman, O., & Packer-Williams, C. (2014). Moving beyond CACREP standards: Training counselors to work competently with LGBT clients. Journal of Counselor Preparation & Supervision, 6(1), 1–19. https://doi.org/10.7729/51.1088 

CONTINUING EDUCATION:

Target Audience: Healthcare and Mental healthcare professionals, University faculty and students. 

Psychologists. This program, when attended in its entirety, is available for 1.5 continuing education credits. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is committed to accessibility and non-discrimination in its continuing education activities. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is also committed to conducting all activities in conformity with the American Psychological Association’s Ethical Principles for Psychologists. Participants are asked to be aware of the need for privacy and confidentiality throughout the program. If program content becomes stressful, participants are encouraged to process these feelings during discussion periods. If participants have special needs, we will attempt to accommodate them. Please address questions, concerns and any complaints to [email protected]. There is no commercial support for this program nor are there any relationships between the CE Sponsor, presenting organization, presenter, program content, research, grants, or other funding that could reasonably be construed as conflicts of interest.

Counselors/Clinical Counselors. This program, when attended in its entirety, is available 1.5 hours of continuing education. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is licensed by the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (IDFPR) to provide continuing education programming for counselors and clinical counselors.License Number: 197.000159

Social Workers. This program, when attended in its entirety, is available for 1.5 hours of continuing education. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is licensed by the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (IDFPR) to provide continuing education programming for social workers. License Number: 159.001036

MFTs, LPCCs, and LCSWs. Course meets the qualifications for 1.5 hour of continuing education credit for MFTs, LPCCs, and/or LCSWs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences. If you are licensed outside of California please check with your local licensing agency to to determine if they will accept these CEUs. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is approved by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences (BBS) to offer continuing education programming for MFTs, LPCCs, LEPs, and/or LCSWs. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is an accredited or approved postsecondary institution that meets the requirements set forth in Sections 4980.54(f)(1), 4989.34, 4996.22(d)(1), or 4999.76(d) of the Code.

NBCC :The Chicago School of Professional Psychology has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 3036. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs. 

Participation Certificate. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is able to provide students and other participants who simply wish to have documentation of their attendance at the program a participation certificate.

Non Psychologists. Most licensing boards accept Continuing Education Credits sponsored by the American Psychological Association but non-psychologists are recommended to consult with their specific state-licensing board to ensure that APA-sponsored CE is acceptable.

*Participants must attend 100% of the program in order to obtain a Certificate of Attendance.

The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is licensed by the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (IDFPR) to provide continuing education programming for counselors and clinical counselors  (License Number: 197.000159) and social workers (License Number: 159.001036). 

The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is approved by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences (BBS) to offer continuing education programming for MFTs, LPCCs, LEPs, and/or LCSWs. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is an accredited or approved postsecondary institution that meets the requirements set forth in Sections 4980.54(f)(1), 4989.34, 4996.22(d)(1), or 4999.76(d) of the Code.

The Chicago School of Professional Psychology has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 3036. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs.

The Chicago School of Professional Psychology’s School Psychology Program is approved by the National Association of School Psychologists to offer continuing professional development. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology  maintains responsibility for this continuing professional development activity.

 If participants have special needs, we will attempt to accommodate them. Please address questions, concerns and any complaints to [email protected]. There is no commercial support for this program nor are there any relationships between the CE Sponsor, presenting organization, presenter, program content, research, grants, or other funding that could reasonably be construed as conflicts of interest.