Applications of Intersectionality to Sexology and Sexuality

Applications of Intersectionality to Sexology and Sexuality

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Program recorded on Friday, August 20, 2021

Program offers 2.0 CEs for Psychologists and 2.0 BBS California CEUs for LPCCs, LPSW, and LMFTs

Workshop Description:

Intersectionality continues to be taken up across several healthcare disciplines as an interdisciplinary enterprise (Bowleg, 2021; Chan et al., 2018; Hankivsky et al., 2014). Drawing from its social justice ethos (Collins, 2019; Collins & Bilge, 2020) and roots in Black feminism (Cole, 2020; Combahee River Collective, 1977/1995; Crenshaw, 1989; Lorde, 1984), intersectionality provides a platform for merging theory, research, and clinical practice and tackling power inequities that shape culture, barriers, and access (Buchanan & Wiklund, 2021). Notably, intersectionality builds upon a central analysis of power and determines the cultural and political implications of sexology and sexuality (Bowleg et al., 2015; Bowleg & Bauer, 2016). Due to its larger analysis of culture, politics, and policy, intersectionality offers opportunities to reinforce a sex-positive approach for a number of historically marginalized communities, especially multiply-marginalized communities (Hargons et al., 2020; Semlyen et al., 2018).

To connect intersectionality’s core tenets, the presentation will draw from an extensive theoretical base to responsibly use intersectionality (Collins & Bilge, 2020; Grzanka, 2020) and describe the richness and genealogy of the theory (Hancock, 2016). The presentation will integrate an overview of key exemplars of extant research that synthesize intersectionality, sexology, and sexuality. To bridge theory with practice, the presenter will illustrate multiple takeaways for clinical practice and systemic interventions for dismantling inequities in sexology and sexuality. The presenter will also involve a case example to foreground future possibilities for clinical practice.

Learning Objectives:

After attending this intermediate-level workshop, participants will be able to:

1. Describe at least 2 key pieces of conceptual and empirical research synthesizing intersectionality, sexology, and sexuality.

2. Integrate tenets of intersectionality theory with clinical practice and training on sexology and sexuality.

3. Demonstrate the use of at least 2 strategies to dismantle inequities related to sexology and sexuality.

Professional Bio of Presenter Christian D. Chan, PhD, NCC, Assistant Professor at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Christian D. Chan (he, him, his), PhD, NCC is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Counseling and Educational Development at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Past-President of the Association for Adult Development and Aging (AADA), Parliamentarian of the Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development (AMCD), and a proud Queer Person of Color. As a scholar-activist, his interests revolve around intersectionality; multiculturalism in counseling practice, supervision, and counselor education; social justice and activism; career development; critical research methodologies; and couple, family, and group modalities with socialization/communication of cultural factors. Dedicated to mentorship for leaders and scholars, he has actively contributed to over 54 peer-reviewed publications in journals, books, and edited volumes and has conducted over 120 refereed presentations at the national, regional, and state levels. He currently serves as Associate Editor for Teaching and Supervision in Counseling.

Program Standards and Goals

This program meets APA’s continuing education standard 1.3: Program content focuses on topics related to psychological practice, education, or research other than application of psychological assessment and/or intervention methods that are supported by contemporary scholarship grounded in established research procedures.

This program meets APA’s continuing education goal 1: Program is relevant to psychological practice, education, and/or science

Registration and Fees:

ACSSW Members: Free. Click here to register to access ACSSW Member courses. Please note, you will need the password provided to you by ACSSW.

General Admission: $40.00

TCSPP Staff/Faculty: Free

TCSPP Faculty and Staff can access this program for free by registering here

TCSPP Students: Free

Current TCSPP Students, with school email address, can access this program for free by registering here

TCSPP Alumni: $20.00

TCSPP Alumni, can find discount codes for this program by registering here

References:

Bowleg, L., & Bauer, G. (2016). Invited reflection: Quantifying intersectionality. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 40(3), 337-341. https://doi.org/10.1177/0361684316654282

Cole, E. R. (2020). Demarginalizing women of color in intersectionality scholarship in psychology: a Black feminist critique. The Journal of Social Issues, 76(4), 1036–1044. https://doi.org/10.1111/josi.12413

Collins, P. H. (2015). Intersectionality’s definitional dilemmas. Annual Review of Sociology, 41(1), 1-20. https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-soc-073014-112142

Collins, P. H. (2019). Intersectionality as critical social theory. Duke University Press.

Collins, P. H., & Bilge, S. (2020). Intersectionality (2nd ed.). Polity Press.

Grzanka, P. R. (2020). From buzzword to critical psychology: An invitation to take intersectionality seriously. Women & Therapy, 43(3), 244–261. https://doi.org/10.1080/02703149.2020.1729473

Hankivsky, O., Grace, D., Hunting, G., Giesbrecht, M., Fridkin, A., Rudrum, S., … Clark, N. (2014). An intersectionality-based policy analysis framework: Critical reflections on a methodology for advancing equity. International Journal for Equity in Health, 13(1), 50–78. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12939-014-0119-x

Hargons, C. N., Dogan, J., Malone, N., Stevens-Watkins, D., Thorpe, S., & Mosley, D. V. (2020). Balancing the sexology scales: A content analysis of Black women’s sexuality research. Culture, Health and Sexuality, (2020). https://doi.org/10.1080/13691058.2020.1776399

Overstreet, N. M., Rosenthal, L., & Case, K. A. (2020). Intersectionality as a radical framework for transforming our disciplines, social issues, and the world. The Journal of Social Issues, 76(4), 779–795. https://doi.org/10.1111/josi.12414

Settles, I. H., Warner, L. R., Buchanan, N. C. T., & Jones, M. K. (2020). Understanding psychology’s resistance to intersectionality theory using a framework of epistemic exclusion and invisibility. The Journal of Social Issues, 76(4), 796–813. https://doi.org/10.1111/josi.12403

CONTINUING EDUCATION:

Target Audience: Healthcare and Mental healthcare professionals, University faculty and students. Members of ACSSW and the TCSPP community.

Psychologists. This program, when attended in its entirety, is available for 2.0 continuing education credits. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is committed to accessibility and non-discrimination in its continuing education activities. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is also committed to conducting all activities in conformity with the American Psychological Association’s Ethical Principles for Psychologists. Participants are asked to be aware of the need for privacy and confidentiality throughout the program. If program content becomes stressful, participants are encouraged to process these feelings during discussion periods. If participants have special needs, we will attempt to accommodate them. Please address questions, concerns and any complaints to Danielle Bohrer at 312-467-2364. There is no commercial support for this program nor are there any relationships between the CE Sponsor, presenting organization, presenter, program content, research, grants, or other funding that could reasonably be construed as conflicts of interest.

Counselors/Clinical Counselors. This program, when attended in its entirety, is available 2.0 hours of continuing education. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is licensed by the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (IDFPR) to provide continuing education programming for counselors and clinical counselors.License Number: 197.000159

Social Workers. This program, when attended in its entirety, is available for 2.0 hours of continuing education. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is licensed by the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (IDFPR) to provide continuing education programming for social workers. License Number: 159.001036

MFTs, LPCCs, and LCSWs. Course meets the qualifications for 2.0 hour of continuing education credit for MFTs, LPCCs, and/or LCSWs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences. If you are licensed outside of California please check with your local licensing agency to to determine if they will accept these CEUs. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is approved by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences (BBS) to offer continuing education programming for MFTs, LPCCs, LEPs, and/or LCSWs. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is an accredited or approved postsecondary institution that meets the requirements set forth in Sections 4980.54(f)(1), 4989.34, 4996.22(d)(1), or 4999.76(d) of the Code.

Participation Certificate. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is able to provide students and other participants who simply wish to have documentation of their attendance at the program a participation certificate.

Non Psychologists. Most licensing boards accept Continuing Education Credits sponsored by the American Psychological Association but non-psychologists are recommended to consult with their specific state-licensing board to ensure that APA-sponsored CE is acceptable.

The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

Presented by The Institute for Professional and Continuing Studies and The Association for Counseling Sexology & Sexual Wellness Applications of Intersectionality to Sexology and Sexuality

Recorded on Friday, August 20, 2021

Program offers 2.0 CEs for Psychologists (APA) 2.0 BBS California CEUs for LPCCs, LPSW, and LMFTs

Workshop Description: Intersectionality continues to be taken up across several healthcare disciplines as an interdisciplinary enterprise (Bowleg, 2021; Chan et al., 2018; Hankivsky et al., 2014). Drawing from its social justice ethos (Collins, 2019; Collins & Bilge, 2020) and roots in Black feminism (Cole, 2020; Combahee River Collective, 1977/1995; Crenshaw, 1989; Lorde, 1984), intersectionality provides a platform for merging theory, research, and clinical practice and tackling power inequities that shape culture, barriers, and access (Buchanan & Wiklund, 2021). Notably, intersectionality builds upon a central analysis of power and determines the cultural and political implications of sexology and sexuality (Bowleg et al., 2015; Bowleg & Bauer, 2016). Due to its larger analysis of culture, politics, and policy, intersectionality offers opportunities to reinforce a sex-positive approach for a number of historically marginalized communities, especially multiply-marginalized communities (Hargons et al., 2020; Semlyen et al., 2018). To connect intersectionality’s core tenets, the presentation will draw from an extensive theoretical base to responsibly use intersectionality (Collins & Bilge, 2020; Grzanka, 2020) and describe the richness and genealogy of the theory (Hancock, 2016). The presentation will integrate an overview of key exemplars of extant research that synthesize intersectionality, sexology, and sexuality. To bridge theory with practice, the presenter will illustrate multiple takeaways for clinical practice and systemic interventions for dismantling inequities in sexology and sexuality. The presenter will also involve a case example to foreground future possibilities for clinical practice.

Learning Objectives: After attending this intermediate-level workshop, participants will be able to:

1. Describe at least 2 key pieces of conceptual and empirical research synthesizing intersectionality, sexology, and sexuality.

2. Integrate tenets of intersectionality theory with clinical practice and training on sexology and sexuality.

3. Demonstrate the use of at least 2 strategies to dismantle inequities related to sexology and sexuality.

Professional Bio of Presenter Christian D. Chan, PhD, NCC, Assistant Professor at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro Christian D. Chan (he, him, his), PhD, NCC is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Counseling and Educational Development at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Past-President of the Association for Adult Development and Aging (AADA), Parliamentarian of the Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development (AMCD), and a proud Queer Person of Color. As a scholar-activist, his interests revolve around intersectionality; multiculturalism in counseling practice, supervision, and counselor education; social justice and activism; career development; critical research methodologies; and couple, family, and group modalities with socialization/communication of cultural factors. Dedicated to mentorship for leaders and scholars, he has actively contributed to over 54 peer-reviewed publications in journals, books, and edited volumes and has conducted over 120 refereed presentations at the national, regional, and state levels. He currently serves as Associate Editor for Teaching and Supervision in Counseling.

Program Standards and Goals This program meets APA’s continuing education standard 1.3: Program content focuses on topics related to psychological practice, education, or research other than application of psychological assessment and/or intervention methods that are supported by contemporary scholarship grounded in established research procedures.

This program meets APA’s continuing education goal 1: Program is relevant to psychological practice, education, and/or science

 Registration and Fees:

ACSSW Members: Free General Admission: $40.00

TCSPP Staff/Faculty: Free

TCSPP Students: Free

TCSPP Alumni: $20.00

Community Partners/Site Supervisors: $20.00

Refund Policy: 100% of tuition is refundable up to 48 hours before the program. Within 48 hours of the program, tuition is nonrefundable.

References: Bowleg, L., & Bauer, G. (2016). Invited reflection: Quantifying intersectionality. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 40(3), 337-341. https://doi.org/10.1177/0361684316654282

Cole, E. R. (2020). Demarginalizing women of color in intersectionality scholarship in psychology: a Black feminist critique. The Journal of Social Issues, 76(4), 1036–1044. https://doi.org/10.1111/josi.12413

Collins, P. H. (2015). Intersectionality's definitional dilemmas. Annual Review of Sociology, 41(1), 1-20. https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-soc-073014-112142 Collins, P. H. (2019). Intersectionality as critical social theory. Duke University Press. Collins, P. H., &

Bilge, S. (2020). Intersectionality (2nd ed.). Polity Press. Grzanka, P. R. (2020). From buzzword to critical psychology: An invitation to take intersectionality seriously. Women & Therapy, 43(3), 244–261. https://doi.org/10.1080/02703149.2020.1729473

Hankivsky, O., Grace, D., Hunting, G., Giesbrecht, M., Fridkin, A., Rudrum, S., … Clark, N. (2014). An intersectionality-based policy analysis framework: Critical reflections on a methodology for advancing equity. International Journal for Equity in Health, 13(1), 50–78. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12939-014-0119-x

Hargons, C. N., Dogan, J., Malone, N., Stevens-Watkins, D., Thorpe, S., & Mosley, D. V. (2020). Balancing the sexology scales: A content analysis of Black women’s sexuality research. Culture, Health and Sexuality, (2020). https://doi.org/10.1080/13691058.2020.1776399

Overstreet, N. M., Rosenthal, L., & Case, K. A. (2020). Intersectionality as a radical framework for transforming our disciplines, social issues, and the world. The Journal of Social Issues, 76(4), 779–795. https://doi.org/10.1111/josi.12414

Settles, I. H., Warner, L. R., Buchanan, N. C. T., & Jones, M. K. (2020). Understanding psychology's resistance to intersectionality theory using a framework of epistemic exclusion and invisibility. The Journal of Social Issues, 76(4), 796–813. https://doi.org/10.1111/josi.12403 CONTINUING EDUCATION:

Target Audience: Healthcare and Mental healthcare professionals, University faculty and students. Members of ACSSW and the TCSPP community. Psychologists. This program, when attended in its entirety, is available for 2.0 continuing education credits. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is committed to accessibility and non-discrimination in its continuing education activities. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is also committed to conducting all activities in conformity with the American Psychological Association’s Ethical Principles for Psychologists. Participants are asked to be aware of the need for privacy and confidentiality throughout the program. If program content becomes stressful, participants are encouraged to process these feelings during discussion periods. If participants have special needs, we will attempt to accommodate them. Please address questions, concerns and any complaints to Danielle Bohrer at 312-467-2364. There is no commercial support for this program nor are there any relationships between the CE Sponsor, presenting organization, presenter, program content, research, grants, or other funding that could reasonably be construed as conflicts of interest. Counselors/Clinical Counselors. This program, when attended in its entirety, is available 2.0 hours of continuing education. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is licensed by the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (IDFPR) to provide continuing education programming for counselors and clinical counselors.License Number: 197.000159 Social Workers. This program, when attended in its entirety, is available for 2.0 hours of continuing education. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is licensed by the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (IDFPR) to provide continuing education programming for social workers. License Number: 159.001036 MFTs, LPCCs, and LCSWs. Course meets the qualifications for 2.0 hour of continuing education credit for MFTs, LPCCs, and/or LCSWs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences. If you are licensed outside of California please check with your local licensing agency to to determine if they will accept these CEUs. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is approved by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences (BBS) to offer continuing education programming for MFTs, LPCCs, LEPs, and/or LCSWs. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is an accredited or approved postsecondary institution that meets the requirements set forth in Sections 4980.54(f)(1), 4989.34, 4996.22(d)(1), or 4999.76(d) of the Code. Participation Certificate. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is able to provide students and other participants who simply wish to have documentation of their attendance at the program a participation certificate. Non Psychologists. Most licensing boards accept Continuing Education Credits sponsored by the American Psychological Association but non-psychologists are recommended to consult with their specific state-licensing board to ensure that APA-sponsored CE is acceptable.

 

*Participants must attend 100% of the program in order to obtain a Certificate of Attendance. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology maintains responsibility for this program and its content.